Mass Mutual and NewsOne join together to present 28 dynamic people that make up the diverse tapestry of Black History. For the entire month of…

The story of Black History Month begins in 1915.  That September, the Harvard-trained historian Carter G. Woodson* and the prominent minister Jesse E. Moorland** founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by Black Americans and other peoples of African descent.   That organization still exists […]

This Black History Month, we honor the GAME CHANGERS: Everyday heroes whose actions make life better for the people around them. SEE ALL OUR GAME…

The first African American Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm was honored with an official stamp as part of the USPS Black Heritage series. Ronald Stroman, Deputy Postmaster General…

A toothpaste known as “Darkie,” featuring a smiling blackface performer as its logo, was sold for years in various parts of Asia. After pressure from…

Say the words “slave revolt” and images of bloody confrontations waged with guns, machetes, and pitchforks come to mind. But the self-liberation of former slaves…

The men and women who serve on the front lines as firefighters, rescuing citizens in harm’s way, should be saluted daily for their bravery. In one of…

The first thing that strikes many about Amiri Baraka‘s poetry, most especially his later works, is that it carried the sharp tone of an oppressed,…

Countee Cullen (pictured), a poet who rose to fame during the Harlem Renaissance, was a contemporary of famed writer Zora Neale Hurston. Cullen amassed an…

Tuskegee Institute student Samuel “Sammy” Younge‘s (pictured) death was an unfortunate first in the history books as it relates to the Civil Rights Movement. On…

Abolitionist John Brown and his attempted armed overthrow of slavery met its end after his raid on Harper’s Ferry, Va. was thwarted by enemy forces.…

In a historic, 60-page decision, Federal District Judge Catherine Blake ruled yesterday that Maryland has violated the constitutional rights of students at Maryland’s four Historically Black Institutions (HBIs), or Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), by unnecessarily duplicating their programs at nearby white institutions, a practice that begin during the era of de jure segregation. […]